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Poll

What will Markus achieve in the NBA?

He'll never see a minute of PT
20 (8.9%)
He'll get a cup of coffee, see some junk minutes this year, and move on
102 (45.5%)
He'll be on a roster most years, but stuck on the end of the bench.
65 (29%)
He'll become a solid role player with an extended career
36 (16.1%)
Dwyane who? Markus is the GOAT.
1 (0.4%)

Total Members Voted: 224

Author Topic: Markus' NBA success  (Read 13461 times)

Coleman

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #50 on: November 20, 2020, 03:14:52 PM »
As part of the free agent contract offer in a case like Markus where there are likely multiple suitors , the players are informally told they will get close to the maximum amount of days. Also Days are different than games. Practices count as days. So yes theoretically, they could get no days and they would then get 77,500 plus the 50,000 camp money and that would be 127,500. NBA wants these kids in the US so they all pay the full allocation.

Also very few people are getting $500,000 in Europe. It is more like $8-10k a month plus some allowances car and housing. A handful of the best most proven players over there get the larger contracts. Guys like DJO who have proven their worth over a long time in Foreign competition do get paid.

NBA has made changes to this season. Max level is based on games, not days.

I have no idea what Markus has been told or guaranteed. Neither do you. You're just speculating. If Markus was that hot of a commodity, he would have gotten drafted.

Markus could easily make over $500,000 in Europe. I wasn't saying that was the average salary or anything, but he was the leading scorer in college basketball. He will get paid overseas.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 03:17:35 PM by Coleman »

GooooMarquette

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #51 on: November 20, 2020, 03:33:15 PM »
Though it would mean neither Sam nor Joey will play for our TBT entry after their NBA careers flame out.


I wonder if Joe Chapman has received a 'letter' yet....

warriorchick

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #52 on: November 20, 2020, 06:13:50 PM »
Cancer is never "fun" my friend...

Gives "Sideline Cancer" an entirely different nuance.
Have some patience, FFS.

Trump Loves The Big East

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #53 on: November 20, 2020, 07:52:18 PM »
NBA has made changes to this season. Max level is based on games, not days.

I have no idea what Markus has been told or guaranteed. Neither do you. You're just speculating. If Markus was that hot of a commodity, he would have gotten drafted.

Markus could easily make over $500,000 in Europe. I wasn't saying that was the average salary or anything, but he was the leading scorer in college basketball. He will get paid overseas.
The better non drafted Free Agents have multiple offers many times they discuss who was interested , we have not had any interviews yet with Markus so we don't now who the other suitors were  . The competition  is how the better free agents milk  milk a two way contract out of the situation versus a camp invite ( what Myles Powell got). I saw the two way  days got changed to games . The upside of that is Markus benefits. NBA wants Markus here and not in Europe.

Markus someday could make good money in Europe. He would get something nice as a first year guy because of  his pedigree. Then he would have to show performance  to get to the levels your talking about. The game there is not a wide open run and gun style like the US.

The better place overseas for Markus game is China. They want and encourage Americans to run up big point totals and pay a lot for that. Markus could also make good money in Korea. They have a good reputation for actually paying their contracts on time .

Coleman

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #54 on: November 20, 2020, 08:24:00 PM »

The better place overseas for Markus game is China. They want and encourage Americans to run up big point totals and pay a lot for that. Markus could also make good money in Korea. They have a good reputation for actually paying their contracts on time .

I agree with this

JWags85

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #55 on: November 21, 2020, 02:11:17 AM »

Markus someday could make good money in Europe. He would get something nice as a first year guy because of  his pedigree. Then he would have to show performance  to get to the levels your talking about. The game there is not a wide open run and gun style like the US.


Really depends on team and fit. While I agree it’s not as open and down as the NBA, there is still a HEAVY emphasis on the 3 ball.  I’ve watched a decent amount of Euroleague basketball over the last few years and what you notice, besides the INFURIATINGLY conservative approach to fast breaks and how often most PGs pull the ball out instead of pushing it, is how often drives that end up going to the rim in the NBA/NCAA, lead to wraparound or kick out passes for 3.  His elite deep shooting prowess suits him well depending on the coach and team.


The better place overseas for Markus game is China. They want and encourage Americans to run up big point totals and pay a lot for that. Markus could also make good money in Korea. They have a good reputation for actually paying their contracts on time .

Now this I totally agree with. I have a couple good customers who are Chinese and CBA crazy so I’ll flip on games late/early to have some reference to chat with them about. The level of basketball is often extremely sloppy but it’s very much defense optional. And every good team’s American player/players has a green light that would make Markus’ green light from Wojo look downright conservative. Markus could easily average 30, no exaggeration, probably higher.

Johnny B

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #56 on: November 21, 2020, 02:18:14 AM »
I believe Markus becomes the second player(Scottie Reynolds) to go undrafted that made first team AA. Just a fun fact

MU82

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #57 on: November 21, 2020, 09:19:27 AM »

The level of basketball is often extremely sloppy but it’s very much defense optional. And every good team’s American player/players has a green light that would make Markus’ green light from Wojo look downright conservative. Markus could easily average 30, no exaggeration, probably higher.

What is considered "good pay" in China?
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Lazar's Headband

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #58 on: November 21, 2020, 10:05:18 AM »
What is considered "good pay" in China?

Jimmer Fredette got a 2 year, $3.6 million deal. ($1.8 million per year. )

harryp

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #59 on: November 21, 2020, 02:38:26 PM »
I looked at the bio's of the top HS recruits -- all except were 6-6 or taller. I think MH has a tough challenge, and ends up in Europe.

MU Fan in Connecticut

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #60 on: November 23, 2020, 12:18:18 PM »
From today's New Haven Register.


MEN’S BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK
Big East came up small in NBA Draft
By David Borges

The Big East was the best conference in the nation last season.

Don’t take our word for it, take a look at the conference NET rankings. The Big East was No. 1, followed by the Big Ten, Big 12, Pac 12, SEC, ACC and the American. The league had four teams (Creighton, Villanova, Seton Hall and Butler) in the final AP Top 25 of the season.

And yet among the “Power Six” (or even “Power Seven”) conferences at the 2020 NBA Draft on Wednesday night, the Big East was the worst. Only two players from Big East teams were among the 60 selected in the two rounds: Villanova’s Saddiq Bey, the league’s only first-rounder, and DePaul’s Paul Reed, who was the third-to-last player picked.

That means the Big East had half as many players selected as the Mountain West, and the same amount — gasp! — the AAC, the Huskies’ home the past seven seasons. And the AAC boasted a pair of first-rounders. That oughta sit well with UConn fans.

Conversely, the SEC had 12 draft picks, followed by the Pac 12 (10), ACC (nine), Big 12 and Mountain West (four each) and Big Ten (three).

Perhaps even more telling, however, is the Big East players who weren’t selected. Myles Powell, the league’s reigning Player of the Year, and Markus Howard, the Big East’s all-time leading scorer, both went undrafted. So did Ty-Shon Alexander and Naji Marshall, both of whom entered the draft after their junior seasons and would have made their respective teams, Creighton and Xavier, much stronger this season.

So what gives? Once again, NBA teams draft largely on athleticism and potential and aren’t overly concerned with what kind of college career a player had. In fact, seniors are often shunned in the draft, particularly in the first round. Why waste a pick that comes with guaranteed money when you can likely sign a seasoned player like Powell or Howard as an undrafted free agent in the hours after the draft?

It feels like more and more, the NBA draft is dominated by physical specimens who play one season for a middling Power Five team, put up decent numbers and proceed straight to the lottery. Of the 48 American college players selected in this year’s draft, about half played on teams that almost certainly weren’t going to the NCAA tournament last March, barring a miracle in their respective conference tourneys.

Great four-year players like Powell, Howard, Ryan Boatright get left on the outside looking in.

This year’s No. 1 overall pick was Anthony Edwards, who “led” Georgia to a 5-13 record in the SEC as a freshman last season. In an interview just before the draft, Edwards said he’d rather be playing football, doesn’t even watch basketball and “loves” the sport only because it’s what he does. The No. 2 overall pick was James Wiseman, who played just three games last season at Memphis before issues surrounding his recruitment led him to quit the team to get ready for the NBA.

Juxtapose that against a guy like Christian Vital, who put his heart and soul into every second he was on the court. But Edwards is a 6-foot-5, 220-pound guard who can score from anywhere on the floor (and doesn’t particularly care for defense). Wiseman is a 7-foot center busting with potential. So, they’re No. 1 and 2 overall, and Vital is playing in Germany.

Incidentally, it makes you wonder whether UConn’s James Bouknight would have been selected on Wednesday night had he decided to declare after his freshman season. Gotta believe someone would have taken a late-first round flyer on the 6-5, super-smooth athlete.

Drafting on size and potential is nothing new, really. It’s why Hasheem Thabeet was the No. 2 overall pick in 2009 and Boatright never really got a sniff of the NBA. Who was a better college player, Andre Drummond or Khalid El-Amin? Who was an NBA lottery pick (correctly so, it turns out) and who spent most of his career playing overseas?

This doesn’t take anything away from the Big East as a conference. It says more about the NBA. Former Providence Journal columnist Bill Reynolds once wrote, “The problem with the NBA is that there’s a place for Chris Dudley and none for Pepe Sanchez.” Same holds true today, just change the names.

The Big East has routinely been one of the top five leagues in the country since the split in 2013. It will be good again this season, thanks in no small part to the return of UConn. It’s got a pair of potential first-rounders in Bouknight and Villanova’s Jeremiah Robinson-Earle, both sophomores.

The best basketball might still be played in the Big East. But many of the players with the potential and “upside” NBA scouts drool over will play in other leagues.

WHEELER KEEPS ROLLING

Last week’s Big East men’s basketball notebook listed the various Connecticut products currently playing Division 1 basketball. Regretfully, we forgot to mention Stamford’s Aaron Wheeler, who is beginning his junior season at Purdue.

Wheeler, a 6-foot-9 junior who sat out his first season at Purdue as a red-shirt, averaged 3.6 points and 4.2 rebounds per game last season for the Boilermakers. He played for two years under Mike Walsh at Trinity Catholic before transferring to St. Andrew’s, then Brewster Academy, where he was named MVP in the 2017 National Prep Championship game.

Wheeler was recruited heavily by Dan Hurley (when Hurley was still at Rhode Island) and Providence’s Ed Cooley, along with Pittsburgh, Seton Hall and Temple, before ultimately opting for Purdue.

His father, William, Jr., was a 1,000-point scorer at Manhattan, and his uncle was a co-captain at Yale.

david.borges  @hearstmediact.com

4everwarriors

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #61 on: November 23, 2020, 02:25:57 PM »
Kant blame Edwards four Georgia's chitty record. He wuzant da coach, aina?
"Give 'Em Hell, Al"

Jockey

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #62 on: November 23, 2020, 02:51:46 PM »
I think Marcus will have a career similar to Jerel McNeal.

Maybe.

But Markus has one elite-level skill. Jerel did not.

Trump Loves The Big East

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #63 on: November 23, 2020, 03:16:59 PM »
From today's New Haven Register.


MEN’S BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK
Big East came up small in NBA Draft
By David Borges

The Big East was the best conference in the nation last season.

Don’t take our word for it, take a look at the conference NET rankings. The Big East was No. 1, followed by the Big Ten, Big 12, Pac 12, SEC, ACC and the American. The league had four teams (Creighton, Villanova, Seton Hall and Butler) in the final AP Top 25 of the season.

And yet among the “Power Six” (or even “Power Seven”) conferences at the 2020 NBA Draft on Wednesday night, the Big East was the worst. Only two players from Big East teams were among the 60 selected in the two rounds: Villanova’s Saddiq Bey, the league’s only first-rounder, and DePaul’s Paul Reed, who was the third-to-last player picked.

That means the Big East had half as many players selected as the Mountain West, and the same amount — gasp! — the AAC, the Huskies’ home the past seven seasons. And the AAC boasted a pair of first-rounders. That oughta sit well with UConn fans.

Conversely, the SEC had 12 draft picks, followed by the Pac 12 (10), ACC (nine), Big 12 and Mountain West (four each) and Big Ten (three).

Perhaps even more telling, however, is the Big East players who weren’t selected. Myles Powell, the league’s reigning Player of the Year, and Markus Howard, the Big East’s all-time leading scorer, both went undrafted. So did Ty-Shon Alexander and Naji Marshall, both of whom entered the draft after their junior seasons and would have made their respective teams, Creighton and Xavier, much stronger this season.

So what gives? Once again, NBA teams draft largely on athleticism and potential and aren’t overly concerned with what kind of college career a player had. In fact, seniors are often shunned in the draft, particularly in the first round. Why waste a pick that comes with guaranteed money when you can likely sign a seasoned player like Powell or Howard as an undrafted free agent in the hours after the draft?

It feels like more and more, the NBA draft is dominated by physical specimens who play one season for a middling Power Five team, put up decent numbers and proceed straight to the lottery. Of the 48 American college players selected in this year’s draft, about half played on teams that almost certainly weren’t going to the NCAA tournament last March, barring a miracle in their respective conference tourneys.

Great four-year players like Powell, Howard, Ryan Boatright get left on the outside looking in.

This year’s No. 1 overall pick was Anthony Edwards, who “led” Georgia to a 5-13 record in the SEC as a freshman last season. In an interview just before the draft, Edwards said he’d rather be playing football, doesn’t even watch basketball and “loves” the sport only because it’s what he does. The No. 2 overall pick was James Wiseman, who played just three games last season at Memphis before issues surrounding his recruitment led him to quit the team to get ready for the NBA.

Juxtapose that against a guy like Christian Vital, who put his heart and soul into every second he was on the court. But Edwards is a 6-foot-5, 220-pound guard who can score from anywhere on the floor (and doesn’t particularly care for defense). Wiseman is a 7-foot center busting with potential. So, they’re No. 1 and 2 overall, and Vital is playing in Germany.

Incidentally, it makes you wonder whether UConn’s James Bouknight would have been selected on Wednesday night had he decided to declare after his freshman season. Gotta believe someone would have taken a late-first round flyer on the 6-5, super-smooth athlete.

Drafting on size and potential is nothing new, really. It’s why Hasheem Thabeet was the No. 2 overall pick in 2009 and Boatright never really got a sniff of the NBA. Who was a better college player, Andre Drummond or Khalid El-Amin? Who was an NBA lottery pick (correctly so, it turns out) and who spent most of his career playing overseas?

This doesn’t take anything away from the Big East as a conference. It says more about the NBA. Former Providence Journal columnist Bill Reynolds once wrote, “The problem with the NBA is that there’s a place for Chris Dudley and none for Pepe Sanchez.” Same holds true today, just change the names.

The Big East has routinely been one of the top five leagues in the country since the split in 2013. It will be good again this season, thanks in no small part to the return of UConn. It’s got a pair of potential first-rounders in Bouknight and Villanova’s Jeremiah Robinson-Earle, both sophomores.

The best basketball might still be played in the Big East. But many of the players with the potential and “upside” NBA scouts drool over will play in other leagues.

WHEELER KEEPS ROLLING

Last week’s Big East men’s basketball notebook listed the various Connecticut products currently playing Division 1 basketball. Regretfully, we forgot to mention Stamford’s Aaron Wheeler, who is beginning his junior season at Purdue.

Wheeler, a 6-foot-9 junior who sat out his first season at Purdue as a red-shirt, averaged 3.6 points and 4.2 rebounds per game last season for the Boilermakers. He played for two years under Mike Walsh at Trinity Catholic before transferring to St. Andrew’s, then Brewster Academy, where he was named MVP in the 2017 National Prep Championship game.

Wheeler was recruited heavily by Dan Hurley (when Hurley was still at Rhode Island) and Providence’s Ed Cooley, along with Pittsburgh, Seton Hall and Temple, before ultimately opting for Purdue.

His father, William, Jr., was a 1,000-point scorer at Manhattan, and his uncle was a co-captain at Yale.

david.borges  @hearstmediact.com

The Big East does very well on the court  when the league is in the part of its roster cycle when teams are heavy with Juniors and Seniors. That was the case in the league last year.  As this article points out NBA drafts for potential rather than performance. So not surprising that few players were drafted from the Big East .   Villanova has been able to consistently recruit draft worthy players because of the very long term strength of their program. Everyone else in the league can come up with a player every once in a while. Our conference got a little bit stronger with the addition of U Conn . I think over time the strength of the conference will  help all the teams in recruiting draft worthy talent.

Will be interesting to see if Sam Hauser is drafted. He seems to be a consensus preseason All ACC , yet not on any mock drafts.

lawdog77

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #64 on: December 07, 2020, 02:18:25 PM »
Came across this today.

The Nuggets’ training camp took another step forward as head coach Michael Malone held his first full practice of the season Sunday. With the entire roster on hand, Malone introduced his seven new players by showcasing their skills in a highlight reel to the returning members of the team.

Wonder what was on it for Markus.

warriorchick

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #65 on: December 07, 2020, 02:57:13 PM »
Came across this today.

The Nuggets’ training camp took another step forward as head coach Michael Malone held his first full practice of the season Sunday. With the entire roster on hand, Malone introduced his seven new players by showcasing their skills in a highlight reel to the returning members of the team.

Wonder what was on it for Markus.

Have some patience, FFS.

Billy Hoyle

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #66 on: December 07, 2020, 03:08:12 PM »
Really depends on team and fit. While I agree it’s not as open and down as the NBA, there is still a HEAVY emphasis on the 3 ball.  I’ve watched a decent amount of Euroleague basketball over the last few years and what you notice, besides the INFURIATINGLY conservative approach to fast breaks and how often most PGs pull the ball out instead of pushing it, is how often drives that end up going to the rim in the NBA/NCAA, lead to wraparound or kick out passes for 3.  His elite deep shooting prowess suits him well depending on the coach and team.

Now this I totally agree with. I have a couple good customers who are Chinese and CBA crazy so I’ll flip on games late/early to have some reference to chat with them about. The level of basketball is often extremely sloppy but it’s very much defense optional. And every good team’s American player/players has a green light that would make Markus’ green light from Wojo look downright conservative. Markus could easily average 30, no exaggeration, probably higher.

Yep, China has no problems with Import players gunning. Jimmer dropped 73 and 75 in a game and averaged almost 38 ppg Contrast that to the Philippines (PBA) where Imports are on non-guaranteed contracts and can be cut (not uncommon in other countries too). Our old buddy Quemont Greer was cut despite being the leading scorer for his team because the Filipino players didn't like his style of play. I could see Markus falling into that category. Of course, if he can get citizenship in a country (like Travis did in Italy) then he can be considered a "domestic" player and end up with a "domestic" contract.
What, you still throwing up bricks? What is this, a Masons convention? Clank, clank! I need, like, a welding torch to play in this league! I got an idea, let's just stop right now and gather up all these bricks and let's build a shelter for the homeless so maybe your mother will have a place to stay

Trump Loves The Big East

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #67 on: December 07, 2020, 04:39:53 PM »
Came across this today.

The Nuggets’ training camp took another step forward as head coach Michael Malone held his first full practice of the season Sunday. With the entire roster on hand, Malone introduced his seven new players by showcasing their skills in a highlight reel to the returning members of the team.

Wonder what was on it for Markus.
I think the music highlights for Markus were:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIWY8UyW9bw

Skatastrophy

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We R Final Four

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #69 on: December 07, 2020, 06:25:10 PM »
Came across this today.

The Nuggets’ training camp took another step forward as head coach Michael Malone held his first full practice of the season Sunday. With the entire roster on hand, Malone introduced his seven new players by showcasing their skills in a highlight reel to the returning members of the team.

Wonder what was on it for Markus.
30 point half.

mug644

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #70 on: December 07, 2020, 06:58:57 PM »
Markus sighting on Nugget’s twitter feed: https://twitter.com/nuggets/status/1336052731388207105?s=20

BLM

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #71 on: December 07, 2020, 07:14:09 PM »
Black Lives Matter

warriorchick

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #72 on: December 07, 2020, 10:26:09 PM »
He passed the ball?  Wtf?

To Bol effen Bol!
Have some patience, FFS.

lawdog77

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #73 on: December 08, 2020, 08:32:02 AM »

Its DJOver

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Re: Markus' NBA success
« Reply #74 on: December 08, 2020, 08:40:26 AM »
More on markus

https://www.nba.com/nuggets/news/training-camp-20201207

Markus continues to be an excellent representative for the University.