collapse

* Resources


UDM 4

* 2020-2021 SOTG Tally


2020-21 Season SoG Tally
Cain3
Carton3
Garcia3
Lewis2
John1
McEwen1

'19-20
'18-19 * '17-18 * '16-17
'15-16 * '14-15 * '13-14
'12-13 * '11-12 * '10-11

* Big East Standings

* Recent Posts

Brian Hamilton / The Athletic Article on MU by dgies9156
[Today at 12:24:55 PM]


The Shaka Era is happening! by Daniel
[Today at 12:22:02 PM]


Big East 2021-2022 Season Thread by Billy Hoyle
[Today at 11:58:38 AM]


[Cracked Sidewalks] West Virginia Preview by Goose
[Today at 11:53:55 AM]


Marquette/BC by Goose
[Today at 11:23:22 AM]


Happy Birthday MUScoop! by 4everwarriors
[Today at 10:53:37 AM]


More conference realignment talk by Fluffy Blue Monster
[Today at 08:18:53 AM]

Please Register - It's FREE!

The absolute only thing required for this FREE registration is a valid e-mail address.  We keep all your information confidential and will NEVER give or sell it to anyone else.
Login to get rid of this box (and ads) , or register NOW!

* Next up: Haunted Hoops scrimmage Oct. 31

Marquette
Marquette

Haunted Hoops

Date/Time: Oct 31, 2021, 9:00am
TV: NA
Schedule for 2020-21
13-14

Author Topic: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules  (Read 10398 times)

StillAWarrior

  • Registered User
  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 3121
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #75 on: June 25, 2021, 03:13:50 PM »
Thanks for that. I didn't know. But what appears likely to happen after all is said and done will be that the student-athlete WILL be allowed to use his/her name or likeness to promote the lessons. As it should be. The coach sure as heck uses his/her name to promote his/her incredibly lucrative camp.

Agreed. Like I said, it was a ridiculous restriction. I know that in the club volleyball world, a kid coming back from college that could really market herself could make a lot of money over the summer. Of course, at a lot of schools those girls are kept on campus all summer which might reduce their earning potential. I think they would be more marketable back home than around campus.
Never wrestle with a pig.  You both get dirty, and the pig likes it.

Newsdreams

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 5888
  • Goal - Win BE
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #76 on: June 25, 2021, 04:40:59 PM »
Those type of policies (LOV) are generally for lottery picks, as it would be hard to prove their loss of earnings otherwise.  Even if they did get this policy, it doesn't help the school if the student athlete is injured.
The school basically ends scholarship contract at the end of school year. So they have no loss. Student could recoup a loss on possible scholarship. Not talking about millions, insurance companies do this all the time. All about probability and they will charge accordingly and make money. Capitalism / Free market 

ATL MU Warrior

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 2297
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #77 on: June 25, 2021, 05:28:53 PM »
I honestly didnt know college gymnastics would garner so much in NIL. I always thought the college gymnast were the ones not good enough/too old to make the Olympics.  Here's a couple articles I found interesting.
https://www.athleticdirectoru.com/articles/how-much-is-nil-really-worth-to-student-athletes/

https://www.ajc.com/sports/mike-check-blog/volleyball-player-proves-less-famous-athletes-can-cash-in-on-nil/KE47XPNO6JGGREDB32CURVGYMU/

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/icon-source-shares-top-nil-130200068.html


Question, can a school put in their scholarship offer a clause about getting a certain percentage of the individuals NIL?
There are hundreds (maybe thousands) of elite level gymnasts that never get close to sniffing the Olympics. They are very very good at gymnastics and do have huge followings.  My 12 year old daughter is a gymnast and my wife is a former gymnast so I know how these things work.

Silkk the Shaka

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 5229
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #78 on: June 26, 2021, 06:16:39 AM »
There are hundreds (maybe thousands) of elite level gymnasts that never get close to sniffing the Olympics. They are very very good at gymnastics and do have huge followings.  My 12 year old daughter is a gymnast and my wife is a former gymnast so I know how these things work.


Shooter McGavin

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 951
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #79 on: June 26, 2021, 09:21:48 AM »
This is where an enterprising donor calling the Garcia family and promising an advertising deal that exceeds the G League minimum would be a savvy move.

Brew,  does marquette have a specific department for this within the athletic department to get these offers and present them to the players?  I’ve been saying this for two years that a team of Marquette employees should be on this daily even if it takes away funding from other students academic/athletic or otherwise in the short term.  The benefit of being ahead of this and keeping players like Garcia will far outweigh the negatives if regular tournaments are on the horizon.

The Equalizer

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 1307
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #80 on: June 26, 2021, 12:07:27 PM »
Brew,  does marquette have a specific department for this within the athletic department to get these offers and present them to the players?  I’ve been saying this for two years that a team of Marquette employees should be on this daily even if it takes away funding from other students academic/athletic or otherwise in the short term.  The benefit of being ahead of this and keeping players like Garcia will far outweigh the negatives if regular tournaments are on the horizon.

I don't believe the NIL rules allow direct payment of players by the college--all the discussions seem to reflect the loss of the NCAA's ability to control independent money-earning activity by the athlete: the volleyball player with a home improvement blog, a player offering lessons, etc.

Old and illegal: A local booster creates a "job" to funnel cash to a prized recruit.  Public opinion is this is viewed as wrong and cheating (except by the fans of the schools that get away with it and win).  The NCAA attempts to rein this in by not allowing athletes to have outside income because it's difficult to separate the cheating booster paying hoops star on a no-show job from the enterprising volleyball player taking ads on her home improvement blog.

New and permitted: The same local booster can license a prized recruits NIL. 

I don't see the need for schools to set up departments to manage this.  A simple phone call from the coach to a booster saying "I really want Player X" will result in a call from the booster to the recruit: "Say, I've got a "College Ambassador Program" job for you if you become a Fighting Beaver at the U of Y. It involves licensing your NIL to me. The job pays $100,000 per year. Interested?"

I simply don't see the NIL funding turning into a fair evaluation of the actualy value of a particular player's name, influencing ability, likeness, etc.  Yes, there will be some of that available, but it's hard to imagine that there's a ton of money to make a college basketball player a celebrity spokesperson based solely on his own NIL. 

But for a top 10 recruit?  Is there anyone here who doesn't see this turning into a battle of deep-pocketed boosters who will be able to come out into the open and use the new NIL rules to buy the best possible team for their school?

For starters, here are some really interesting discussion topics I haven't seen brought up yet:

1. Where does MU's booster community stand relative to others schools in the Big East (and the NCAA overall) in terms of being able to fund a competitive team?  How wealthy are our boosters and how willing are they to open their wallets? 

2. Will this permanently impact the competitive balance in certain leagues?  For example, will we see Alabama boosters fund football players to the exclusion of the basketball team, and the opposite at Kentucky, resulting in a situation where UK is always a contender in basketball and Alabama always an also-ran in basketball (and the opposite in football)?  Are there programs that will be able to afford both?

3. What will happen from teams that lack the deep-pocketed alums and the school also lacks the geography, demographics or size to generate even modest organic NIL contracts?  I don't see either organic NIL or a lot of booster money for, say, Central Arkansas or Missouri State.  That having been said, do schools near big media markets have a built in advantage?

4. What will be the going rate to ensure a recruit's signature on a letter of intent?   I assume a sliding scale (top 10 earning more than 50 to 100).  Where does the slide end?  Can a recruit outside the top 100 still generate sizable NIL money? 

5. Are there any dark horses who have underperformed for years, but going to emerge when their boosters can openly contract for their recruits' NIL? Could, for example, DePaul suddenly become a national contender because there's enough Chicago booster money to outbid UK, UNC or Kansas for top players' NIL?

6. Similarly, are there any perennial teams that lack the booster wealth to pay the NIL going rates?  Could we see, say, Gonzaga return to mid-major performance because their boosters are collectively less wealthy than others?

7. What about avoiding transfers?  I'm sure the unknown player who turns into a freshman star is going to be worth more in terms of NIL.  Can he throw around transfer threats to secure more NIL money?

I'm sure there are more interesting discussion points in addition to these--all of which are more relevant than continuing discussions of gymnasts or tuba players.







MU82

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 16837
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #81 on: June 28, 2021, 04:25:14 PM »
College Players May Make Money Off Their Fame, Powerful N.C.A.A. Panel Recommends

Pressured by a wave of state laws taking effect on July 1, the college sports industry is on the verge of letting players profit off their names, images and likenesses.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/28/sports/ncaabasketball/ncaa-athletes-endorsement-deals.html?campaign_id=60&emc=edit_na_20210628&instance_id=0&nl=breaking-news&ref=headline&regi_id=108420427&segment_id=61982&user_id=d36dcf821462fdd16ec3636710a855fa

N.C.A.A. leaders on Monday recommended a hastily crafted plan for student-athletes to make endorsements and profit off their names, one of the final steps toward a groundbreaking shift in the philosophical and financial underpinnings of college sports.

The guidelines, which a committee of commissioners and athletic directors recommended just three days before new state laws designed to challenge the N.C.A.A. were to take effect, are poised to offer coast-to-coast clearance for students to earn money through autograph signings, personal appearances, endorsements, social media and other kinds of deals.

Taken together, the state laws and likely to be relaxed industry rules will open a new era in college sports and allow players — not just schools, conferences, coaches and the N.C.A.A. itself — to look to the marketplace to capitalize on their fame for the first time. Some athletes could earn hundreds of thousands of dollars or more, though most are expected to pull in far smaller sums, if anything at all.

A board mostly filled with university chancellors and presidents must still sign off on the plan, which officials spent days refining after a Supreme Court ruling last week made the N.C.A.A. more vulnerable to antitrust challenges. But college sports executives ultimately expect the group’s backing during a meeting on Wednesday.

“A lot of the stuff that we believe in and that I’ve always believed in — it takes time. It’s not a quick fix. It’s not an instant-gratification thing. It’s a drip-by-drip process.”

-- Shaka Smart, in The Athletic, 10/13/21

Pakuni

  • Registered User
  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 8866
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #82 on: June 28, 2021, 05:26:54 PM »

I don't see the need for schools to set up departments to manage this.  A simple phone call from the coach to a booster saying "I really want Player X" will result in a call from the booster to the recruit: "Say, I've got a "College Ambassador Program" job for you if you become a Fighting Beaver at the U of Y. It involves licensing your NIL to me. The job pays $100,000 per year. Interested?"
I simply don't see the NIL funding turning into a fair evaluation of the actualy value of a particular player's name, influencing ability, likeness, etc.  Yes, there will be some of that available, but it's hard to imagine that there's a ton of money to make a college basketball player a celebrity spokesperson based solely on his own NIL. 
But for a top 10 recruit?  Is there anyone here who doesn't see this turning into a battle of deep-pocketed boosters who will be able to come out into the open and use the new NIL rules to buy the best possible team for their school?

1. This already happens.
2. The NCAA interim rules for NIL state payments "in exchange for athletic performance or attendance" at a particular school is prohibited.
Of course, the NCAA would have to prove some kind of quid-pro-quo, but again, that's status quo..

PointWarrior

  • Team Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #83 on: June 28, 2021, 06:18:38 PM »
Can't wait for first player to sue a coach cause of lack of playing time impacted their NIL :)

WhiteTrash

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 1422
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #84 on: June 28, 2021, 06:32:31 PM »
1. This already happens.
2. The NCAA interim rules for NIL state payments "in exchange for athletic performance or attendance" at a particular school is prohibited.
Of course, the NCAA would have to prove some kind of quid-pro-quo, but again, that's status quo..
1. Robbery and murder already happens,  so what? The fact that schools cheat is not a reason for changing rules. If your in favor of no rules, that's fine but just because some schools cheat is a lazy argument.
2. I'm not opposed to NIL, but the NCAA and specifically the member schools are in a tough spot to create a level playing field.

Unfortunately some schools are not like MU who plays by the rules. The NCAA has to regulate the SEC.

Uncle Rico

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 2694
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #85 on: June 28, 2021, 06:35:37 PM »
1. Robbery and murder already happens,  so what? The fact that schools cheat is not a reason for changing rules. If your in favor of no rules, that's fine but just because some schools cheat is a lazy argument.
2. I'm not opposed to NIL, but the NCAA and specifically the member schools are in a tough spot to create a level playing field.

Unfortunately some schools are not like MU who plays by the rules. The NCAA has to regulate the SEC.

There isn’t a level playing field now
Tis a shame, 'tis a rotton shame, for if ye can enjoy the walkin’ ye can probably enjoy the other times in yer life when ve're in between. And that's most o' the time; wouldn't ye say?

WhiteTrash

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 1422
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #86 on: June 28, 2021, 06:51:31 PM »
There isn’t a level playing field now
I agree but should there not be an effort to make it level? Pro sports do it fairly well.

If the schools want to go to a wide open pay for players system that's fine but then we'll need a new division for non-state schools that can't afford players. I really don't care, I just want a fair system.

Uncle Rico

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 2694
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #87 on: June 28, 2021, 07:03:30 PM »
I agree but should there not be an effort to make it level? Pro sports do it fairly well.

If the schools want to go to a wide open pay for players system that's fine but then we'll need a new division for non-state schools that can't afford players. I really don't care, I just want a fair system.

The schools aren’t paying a nickel for NIL
Tis a shame, 'tis a rotton shame, for if ye can enjoy the walkin’ ye can probably enjoy the other times in yer life when ve're in between. And that's most o' the time; wouldn't ye say?

Pakuni

  • Registered User
  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 8866
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #88 on: June 28, 2021, 07:31:42 PM »
1. Robbery and murder already happens,  so what? The fact that schools cheat is not a reason for changing rules. If your in favor of no rules, that's fine but just because some schools cheat is a lazy argument.
Can you point out where I or anyone else has supported NIL because schools cheat anyhow?


Quote
2. I'm not opposed to NIL, but the NCAA and specifically the member schools are in a tough spot to create a level playing field.

In what fantasy world has there ever been a level playing field in NCAA athletics? Do you believe Ohio State and Akron have been playing on a level  field? Or Kentucky and Austin Peay?

Pakuni

  • Registered User
  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 8866
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #89 on: June 28, 2021, 07:34:02 PM »
I agree but should there not be an effort to make it level? Pro sports do it fairly well.

Pro sports do it fairly well by sharing revenues among teams, as well as with the athletes.
That's the last thing the NCAA wants.

Fluffy Blue Monster

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 6241
  • Send it in...medium-sized fella!!
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #90 on: June 28, 2021, 07:44:40 PM »
Pro sports do it fairly well by sharing revenues among teams, as well as with the athletes.
That's the last thing the NCAA wants.


Yeah, if the NCAA really wanted to make things level, NIL disparities are WAY down the list of things they should be concerned about.
“True patriotism hates injustice in its own land more than anywhere else.”  -Clarence Darrow

MU82

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 16837
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #91 on: June 28, 2021, 07:48:08 PM »
I agree but should there not be an effort to make it level? Pro sports do it fairly well.

If the schools want to go to a wide open pay for players system that's fine but then we'll need a new division for non-state schools that can't afford players. I really don't care, I just want a fair system.

The boat sailed on there being a level playing field in college sports ... oh ... at least 100 years ago. The NCAA sure hasn't shown interest or ability in doing so.
“A lot of the stuff that we believe in and that I’ve always believed in — it takes time. It’s not a quick fix. It’s not an instant-gratification thing. It’s a drip-by-drip process.”

-- Shaka Smart, in The Athletic, 10/13/21

Jockey

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 1365
  • “We want to get rid of the ballots"
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #92 on: June 28, 2021, 08:44:58 PM »
I agree but should there not be an effort to make it level? Pro sports do it fairly well.

If the schools want to go to a wide open pay for players system that's fine but then we'll need a new division for non-state schools that can't afford players. I really don't care, I just want a fair system.


NIL has nothing to do with schools paying players.

dgies9156

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 3295
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #93 on: June 28, 2021, 11:12:50 PM »
I don't believe the NIL rules allow direct payment of players by the college--all the discussions seem to reflect the loss of the NCAA's ability to control independent money-earning activity by the athlete: the volleyball player with a home improvement blog, a player offering lessons, etc.


Brother Equalizer, some answers!

1. Where does MU's booster community stand relative to others schools in the Big East (and the NCAA overall) in terms of being able to fund a competitive team?  How wealthy are our boosters and how willing are they to open their wallets?  Enthusiastic but cheap. Do you really see enough big-time boosters in our program to ensure we have the team to complete at the highest levels of the NCAA? I don't and I think that's a HUGE risk for MU basketball. Dick Strong has disappeared and I question whether there's another Strongman lurking in the background.

And so you don't think I'm just picking on us, I see this as a major problem for most of the Big East, for Gonzaga and for most private universities not named Notre Dame. I don't see the boosters stepping up the way they will at North Carolina, Kentucky, Texas, Virginia etc. My fear is we are a dinosaur.


2. Will this permanently impact the competitive balance in certain leagues?  For example, will we see Alabama boosters fund football players to the exclusion of the basketball team, and the opposite at Kentucky, resulting in a situation where UK is always a contender in basketball and Alabama always an also-ran in basketball (and the opposite in football)?  Are there programs that will be able to afford both? What do you think? Of course it will. In the SEC, an all-sports program means places like Alabama, Florida, even LSU and the UT Vols, not to mention Texas A&M, will start bidding wars. This will escalate into the stratosphere. Look at what's happening with the shoe companies and the way they pay 'handlers!'

3. What will happen from teams that lack the deep-pocketed alums and the school also lacks the geography, demographics or size to generate even modest organic NIL contracts?  I don't see either organic NIL or a lot of booster money for, say, Central Arkansas or Missouri State.  That having been said, do schools near big media markets have a built in advantage? Same thing that happens to them in college football. They get squashed. As for major markets, I think the bigger issue is exposure and what conference you're in. The Power 5 will inevitably spread their largess. The BEast has a good TV contract which creates visibility but the lack of huge booster groups (except, maybe, at Villanova) may offset any TV advantage.

4. What will be the going rate to ensure a recruit's signature on a letter of intent?   I assume a sliding scale (top 10 earning more than 50 to 100).  Where does the slide end?  Can a recruit outside the top 100 still generate sizable NIL money?  Can a defensive tackle get the same money as a first round quarterback in the NFL? Hardly. Depends on need at the time, who is competing and how badly a school wants a player. Coaching will still matter and people will go where the coaches are really good and have a great record of getting their players to the show -- but it won't be cheap!

5. Are there any dark horses who have underperformed for years, but going to emerge when their boosters can openly contract for their recruits' NIL? Could, for example, DePaul suddenly become a national contender because there's enough Chicago booster money to outbid UK, UNC or Kansas for top players' NIL? C'mon, you're talking DePaul. The school that made Jean Lenti-Ponsetto a goddess. Seriously, my candidate for underperformer who enters into blue blood status is the University of Memphis. They own a fertile recruiting ground (Memphis) and have shown a willingness to throw money around like candy from a parade float for the right guys. Miami also would be a good place to look for this.

DePaul's ultimate problem is they are a small fish in a very large pond. Chicago is a market at least 10 major conference schools can claim as their own (OK, since you asked, Notre Dame, Illinois, Northwestern, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Indiana, Purdue, Michigan State and Marquette. All have big alumni concentrations in the Chicago area). Little fish tend to be bait in a big market like Chicago.


6. Similarly, are there any perennial teams that lack the booster wealth to pay the NIL going rates?  Could we see, say, Gonzaga return to mid-major performance because their boosters are collectively less wealthy than others? See above. Gonzaga, Dayton and maybe even Duke would qualify. Most of the Big East falls into this category.

7. What about avoiding transfers?  I'm sure the unknown player who turns into a freshman star is going to be worth more in terms of NIL.  Can he throw around transfer threats to secure more NIL money? Uuuhh, can you threaten to leave if your boss doesn't pay you enough? Of course. I promise this will happen. Jeronne Maymon was born about 10 years too soon. Think of what Tim Maymon would have been like if there was real money involved!


I'm sure there are more interesting discussion points in addition to these--all of which are more relevant than continuing discussions of gymnasts or tuba players.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2021, 11:20:21 PM by dgies9156 »

Galway Eagle

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 8860
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #94 on: June 28, 2021, 11:20:43 PM »

Brother Equalizer, some answers!

1. Where does MU's booster community stand relative to others schools in the Big East (and the NCAA overall) in terms of being able to fund a competitive team?  How wealthy are our boosters and how willing are they to open their wallets?  Enthusiastic but cheap. Do you really see enough big-time boosters in our program to ensure we have the team to complete at the highest levels of the NCAA? I don't and I think that's a HUGE risk for MU basketball. Dick Strong has disappeared and I question whether there's another Strongman lurking in the background.

And so you don't think I'm just picking on us, I see this as a major problem for most of the Big East, for Gonzaga and for most private universities not named Notre Dame. I don't see the boosters stepping up the way they will at North Carolina, Kentucky, Texas, Virginia etc. My fear is we are a dinosaur.


2. Will this permanently impact the competitive balance in certain leagues?  For example, will we see Alabama boosters fund football players to the exclusion of the basketball team, and the opposite at Kentucky, resulting in a situation where UK is always a contender in basketball and Alabama always an also-ran in basketball (and the opposite in football)?  Are there programs that will be able to afford both? What do you think? Of course it will. In the SEC, an all-sports program means places like Alabama, Florida, even LSU and the UT Vols, not to mention Texas A&M, will start bidding wars. This will escalate into the stratosphere. Looka at's happening with the shoe companies and the way they pay 'handlers!'

3. What will happen from teams that lack the deep-pocketed alums and the school also lacks the geography, demographics or size to generate even modest organic NIL contracts?  I don't see either organic NIL or a lot of booster money for, say, Central Arkansas or Missouri State.  That having been said, do schools near big media markets have a built in advantage? Same thing that happens to them in college football. They get squashed. As for major markets, I think the bigger issue is exposure and what conference you're in. The Power 5 will inevitably spread their largess. The Beast has a good TV contract which creates visibility but the lack of huge booster groups (except, maybe, at Villanova) may offset any TV advantage.

4. What will be the going rate to ensure a recruit's signature on a letter of intent?   I assume a sliding scale (top 10 earning more than 50 to 100).  Where does the slide end?  Can a recruit outside the top 100 still generate sizable NIL money?  Can a defensive tackle get the same money as a first round quarterback in the NFL? Hardly. Depends on need at the time, who is competing and how badly a school wants a player. Coaching will still matter and people will go where the coaches are really good and have a great record of getting their players to the show -- but it won't be cheap!

5. Are there any dark horses who have underperformed for years, but going to emerge when their boosters can openly contract for their recruits' NIL? Could, for example, DePaul suddenly become a national contender because there's enough Chicago booster money to outbid UK, UNC or Kansas for top players' NIL? C'mon, you're talking DePaul. The school that made Jean Lenti-Ponsetto a goddess. Seriously, my candidate for underperformer who enters into blue blood status is the University of Memphis. They own a fertile recruiting ground (Memphis) and have shown a willingness to throw money around like candy from a parade float for the right guys. Miami also would be a good place to look for this.

DePaul's ultimate problem is they are a small fish in a very large pond. Chicago is a market at least 10 major conference schools can claim as their own (OK, since you asked, Notre Dame, Illinois, Northwestern, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Indiana, Purdue, Michigan State and Marquette. All have big alumni concentrations in the Chicago area. Little fish tend to be bait in a big market like Chicago.


6. Similarly, are there any perennial teams that lack the booster wealth to pay the NIL going rates?  Could we see, say, Gonzaga return to mid-major performance because their boosters are collectively less wealthy than others? See above. Gonzaga, Dayton and maybe even Duke would qualify. Most of the Big East falls into this category.

7. What about avoiding transfers?  I'm sure the unknown player who turns into a freshman star is going to be worth more in terms of NIL.  Can he throw around transfer threats to secure more NIL money? Uuuhh, can you threaten to leave if your boss doesn't pay you enough? Of course. I promise this will happen. Jeronne Maymon was born about 10 years too soon. Think of what Tim Maymon would have been like if there was real money involved!


I'm sure there are more interesting discussion points in addition to these--all of which are more relevant than continuing discussions of gymnasts or tuba players.

Just gonna go out on a limb and say you're wildly understating depaul. Marquette has a ton of stakeholders in the Chicagoland area, Depaul is the biggest Catholic School in the country though on par with many state schools, if we aggressively say each of those non northwestern schools puts 15% of their alumni in the Chicagoland area and depaul keeps 50% or even less then they still outnumber the majority of those other schools (UofI and NW not included in this).  Essentially I'd wager Depaul has a great opportunity to be something here they will likely bungle it, though it won't have anything to do with your logic.
Maigh Eo for Sam

Fluffy Blue Monster

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 6241
  • Send it in...medium-sized fella!!
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #95 on: June 29, 2021, 07:29:29 AM »
DePaul has a lot of alumni, but I just don't think a lot of them are very interested in their college basketball team.
“True patriotism hates injustice in its own land more than anywhere else.”  -Clarence Darrow

lawdog77

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 1108
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #96 on: June 29, 2021, 08:23:52 AM »
On a side note, Dawson Garcia has 10K+ Instagram followers. Googling that, he should make about $100 per post. That's all I know on how to make $$ on Instagram.

Does MU offer any sort of course on social media/monetizing?

PointWarrior

  • Team Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #97 on: June 29, 2021, 10:26:27 AM »
Awesome - can’t wait for players to start making plays for themselves to drive social media traffic than making good team decisions.




On a side note, Dawson Garcia has 10K+ Instagram followers. Googling that, he should make about $100 per post. That's all I know on how to make $$ on Instagram.

Does MU offer any sort of course on social media/monetizing?

Fluffy Blue Monster

  • All American
  • *****
  • Posts: 6241
  • Send it in...medium-sized fella!!
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #98 on: June 29, 2021, 10:29:09 AM »
Awesome - can’t wait for players to start making plays for themselves to drive social media traffic than making good team decisions.


Does this happen in professional sports now?
“True patriotism hates injustice in its own land more than anywhere else.”  -Clarence Darrow

PointWarrior

  • Team Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
Re: NCAA Might Lift All NIL Rules
« Reply #99 on: June 29, 2021, 10:49:28 AM »
Dumb response.  Pro’s having million dollar and up base contracts and millions more in incentives.  Role player in college likely makes little, could definitely be interested making some more cash with self-promotion on social media. 




Does this happen in professional sports now?