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Author Topic: Great steak at home  (Read 1480 times)

skianth16

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #50 on: January 08, 2019, 02:46:17 PM »
The best steak I've made at home is with the sous vide then sear at the end in a cast iron pan.  Anyone else have an anova or similar sous vide?

Yup, my wife just got me one for Christmas, and by far the best steak I've made at home was with the sous vide. I know some people don't like that it takes so much longer, but I think it's well worth the wait. I highly recommend these.
That's a nice doll you have there Frank.

Yeah thanks, she's ok.

skianth16

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #51 on: January 08, 2019, 02:52:51 PM »
No.  You season only with salt and pepper, and you let it sit on the meat for an hour.

I don't remember where I read this, but the best advice I've seen on cooking a steak at home is to use more salt that you think you need. Basically, put a lot of salt on, and then when you think it might be a bit too salty, add about 50% more. Once it's been seasoned (I always add some pepper too, sometimes Montreal mix), let it sit out for 30-60 minutes before cooking. The added salt has made a big difference. I love it.

My personal preference now is to use the sous vide for 2 hours, get the steak to 125, then sear in a hot cast iron with butter and minced garlic for 30-45 seconds per side. It's just as good as a lot of steakhouses, IMO.
That's a nice doll you have there Frank.

Yeah thanks, she's ok.

ZiggysFryBoy

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #52 on: January 08, 2019, 04:08:08 PM »
Any of you blowhards use an instant pot for your steaks?
Unless Sultan says differently that is, then we’d obviously have to go with that....

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Chili

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #53 on: January 08, 2019, 04:29:12 PM »
I don't remember where I read this, but the best advice I've seen on cooking a steak at home is to use more salt that you think you need. Basically, put a lot of salt on, and then when you think it might be a bit too salty, add about 50% more. Once it's been seasoned (I always add some pepper too, sometimes Montreal mix), let it sit out for 30-60 minutes before cooking. The added salt has made a big difference. I love it.

My personal preference now is to use the sous vide for 2 hours, get the steak to 125, then sear in a hot cast iron with butter and minced garlic for 30-45 seconds per side. It's just as good as a lot of steakhouses, IMO.

One thing is the average home cook doesn't know how to properly season food and most underseason when they can see it on the surface of an item.

There is science behind seasoning and letting your steak dry out (on the surface) before cooking. You should season it very liberally about at least a few hours before cooking and let it rest elevated on a rack. What will happen is the salt will initially draw moisture out of the steak. Once that moisture mixes with the salt it will go back into the steak and take the salt with it to properly season the steak. You're essentially self brining the steak.

You can also dry the surface of the steak out for a few days in the fridge or the counter for a few hours which will help you get a very solid sear on the meat since you won't be wasting energy evaporating moisture off the steak. This same principle applies to roasting a chicken that you need to season it and rest it on the counter for a few hours before you roast it. Also needs to be stuffed and trussed.

But I like to throw handfuls...

mudeltaforcegurl

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #54 on: January 08, 2019, 08:29:20 PM »
One thing is the average home cook doesn't know how to properly season food and most underseason when they can see it on the surface of an item.

There is science behind seasoning and letting your steak dry out (on the surface) before cooking. You should season it very liberally about at least a few hours before cooking and let it rest elevated on a rack. What will happen is the salt will initially draw moisture out of the steak. Once that moisture mixes with the salt it will go back into the steak and take the salt with it to properly season the steak. You're essentially self brining the steak.

You can also dry the surface of the steak out for a few days in the fridge or the counter for a few hours which will help you get a very solid sear on the meat since you won't be wasting energy evaporating moisture off the steak. This same principle applies to roasting a chicken that you need to season it and rest it on the counter for a few hours before you roast it. Also needs to be stuffed and trussed.

A few days? I’m not skilled at cooking. Can you explain how someone won’t get sick?

jesmu84

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #55 on: January 08, 2019, 08:57:01 PM »
Clearly people didn't read the article I posted.

Buy the book "The Food Lab" and eliminate all the myths surrounding food/cooking.

Chili

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #56 on: January 08, 2019, 10:16:57 PM »
A few days? I’m not skilled at cooking. Can you explain how someone won’t get sick?

Sorry I missed that if it's more than a few hours do it in fridge uncovered.
But I like to throw handfuls...

Chili

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #57 on: January 08, 2019, 10:19:24 PM »
Clearly people didn't read the article I posted.

Buy the book "The Food Lab" and eliminate all the myths surrounding food/cooking.

Woops. Yes Kenji from Serious Eats explains it. I got it also from Michael Rhulman and his chicken recipe he leaned from Thomas Keller.
But I like to throw handfuls...

jesmu84

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #58 on: January 09, 2019, 08:20:53 AM »
Woops. Yes Kenji from Serious Eats explains it. I got it also from Michael Rhulman and his chicken recipe he leaned from Thomas Keller.

Solid list. Lots to learn from those guys.

theBabyDavid

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #59 on: January 09, 2019, 08:44:24 PM »
Speaking of taste, why in god's name would you broadcast that your drink of choice is Laphroaig? Did you do finishing school on a pirate ship? Spend some money and get yourself a decent batch of the Balvenie (I recommend the Tun 1401 if you can find it). You might find yourself a palate too.

I share your affection for The Balvenie, actually. I have a 12 year DoubleWood in the liquor locker - a solid Speyside whiskey. The Balvenie DW tends to have lots of fruit on the nose and honey on the palate. I keep The Balvenie DW on hand because it is something you can serve the beginner and the connoisseur alike. Keep in mind that The Balvenie is a Grant product and they make the various offerings by the ocean-full.

Islays are an acquired taste and I will grant that many people never embrace their complex charm. For me, Laphroaig has a special place in my world: my paternal Gram was from Edinburgh and she dosed all us wee bairns with a dram at the first hint of a cold (which I do with theBabyDavid, of course.)

Talisker and Laphroaig are excellent representatives of the Islays but Lap 10 is firmly established as my go to everyday whiskey. If The Balvenie is Bach's Air on the G String then Laphroaig is Beethoven's 9th "Ode to Joy". Rich, full of character, and complex. Lap 10 hits the nose then palate with smoky peat, seaweed, and brine but mellows into honey and orange.

If Lap 10 is too peaty I would suggest the Laphroaig 4 Oak or the Triple Wood. These Laphroaig's have toned down the rich smoke though it is still the whiskey's most distinguishing characteristic.

And for special occasions I highly recommend the Lap 25. The 25 opens with a dramatic sherry sweetness which is followed by a more subdued smoky peat. Quite simply a beautiful whiskey.
"I don't care what Chick says, my mom's a babe" 

theBabyDavid

Hards_Alumni

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #60 on: January 09, 2019, 08:56:59 PM »
One thing is the average home cook doesn't know how to properly season food and most underseason when they can see it on the surface of an item.

There is science behind seasoning and letting your steak dry out (on the surface) before cooking. You should season it very liberally about at least a few hours before cooking and let it rest elevated on a rack. What will happen is the salt will initially draw moisture out of the steak. Once that moisture mixes with the salt it will go back into the steak and take the salt with it to properly season the steak. You're essentially self brining the steak.

You can also dry the surface of the steak out for a few days in the fridge or the counter for a few hours which will help you get a very solid sear on the meat since you won't be wasting energy evaporating moisture off the steak. This same principle applies to roasting a chicken that you need to season it and rest it on the counter for a few hours before you roast it. Also needs to be stuffed and trussed.

This guy knows his stuff.

Waldo Jeffers

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Re: Great steak at home
« Reply #61 on: January 10, 2019, 09:10:34 AM »
Lap 10 hits the nose then palate with aroma of a wet band-aid smoky peat, seaweed, and brine but mellows into honey and orange.


corrected for accuracy