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Author Topic: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud  (Read 1197 times)

MU82

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NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« on: October 07, 2019, 12:14:19 PM »
Newly released NCAA records show a Pac-12 president came up with a way to help the NCAA catch schools who fraudulently help student athletes stay eligible and avoid complaints of NCAA enforcement overreach. But his proposal failed after an NCAA committee found little support from athletic conferences.

https://www.newsobserver.com/sports/college/article235794402.html

University of Oregon President Michael Schill made the proposal for a panel of university presidents who are not serving on NCAA committees to identify egregious academic fraud. But Schill’s proposal didn’t survive. It was dropped despite two special NCAA committees’ recommendations in the wake of the UNC-Chapel Hill academic-athletic scandal that the association step up policing of academic fraud in egregious cases.

Ellen Staurowsky, a Drexel University sport management professor, said the proposal appeared to be an effective way to address universities’ stated fears. Staurowsky co-authored the book “College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA Amateur Myth.”

“The fact that the association is so resistive to this kind of scrutiny suggests that there is so much (academic fraud) out there than they want to have revealed,” she said.


Other tidbits:

++ Schill also proposed removing NCAA discretion from “non-egregious” cases of academic misconduct, leaving those decisions up to member schools. He predicted both proposals would have Pac-12 support if passed in tandem. “The idea is I am willing to increase discretion for one category if we can decrease it in another,” he wrote.

++ The proposal drew support from the NCAA Division I Academic Council, according to a June report, finding a presidents panel would provide the proper “guardrails” to protect schools from NCAA enforcement overreach.

++ Ramogi Huma, executive director of the National Collegiate Players Association, said Schill’s unsuccessful proposal speaks to why California lawmakers passed their profit-off-likeness legislation — they don’t believe the NCAA can adopt any meaningful reform. The association advocates for athletes’ right to compensation, health and safety standards and academic opportunities, and describes the NCAA as an “economic cartel.”

He said what happened to Schill’s idea appeared to another example of “that economic cartel squashing a reform idea that could have helped improve academic protections for college athletes.”

++ The academic fraud reform effort stems from the outcry following the NCAA Committee on Infractions’ decision two years ago that it could not punish UNC-Chapel Hill over classes that offered high grades but no instruction. A detailed investigation by a former federal prosecutor found an academic secretary created and graded many of the classes. More than 3,100 students took at least one. UNC escaped NCAA sanctions by claiming the classes did not violate university rules at the time they were offered, and the classes were made available to all students. But the prosecutor’s investigation found academic counselors to the athletes, particularly in the money-making sports of men’s basketball and football, knew that the secretary was creating the classes and grading them. Those counselors steered athletes to the classes, helping to explain why athletes accounted for nearly half of the enrollments while making up less than 5 percent of the student body.

++ Staurowsky said she suspects the accrediting commissions have said little publicly about the NCAA’s rule change because they aren’t set up to catch academic fraud, either. “If that mechanism was working, we would have well known about North Carolina before the long march to get to the truth,” she said. “There is nothing in that mechanism in any way, shape or form that would address the issue, because the accrediting agencies rely on the schools to be truthful.”

Bottom line (my opinion, based on the facts in this article):

The NCAA has little appetite for aggressively fighting academic fraud. This despite strong  recommendations from the Rice Commission and Division I Academic Council to do so.

The NCAA totally dropped the ball on the UNC situation, hiding behind the flimsy "classes were available to all students" defense even though it was obvious that the athletics department and the basketball and football programs were complicit. If ever there was a "lack of institutional control," it was this.

The NCAA will fight tooth and nail to protect the golden spigot of money that streams in from TV networks, apparel companies, boosters and sponsors -- under the sham of "amateurism," and under the oft-stated lie that it cares about academics first.

When given the opportunity to adopt meaningful reform that could root out academic fraud -- something that strikes at the very heart of each university's stated mission -- leaders at NCAA institutions repeatedly turn tail.

Can't afford to find and punish academic fraud, after all, because that might clog the spigot.
“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

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Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2019, 08:03:39 PM »
How long you going to beat your head against this one?

The National Collegiate ATHLETIC Association


”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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dgies9156

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2019, 10:13:34 PM »
How long you going to beat your head against this one?

The National Collegiate ATHLETIC Association

Brother Cheeks, I hear you Man. But for crying out loud, haven't you seen the NCAA's commercials touting their commitment to academics. Saw yet another "gag me" commercial featuring Jerry Rice last weekend.

Brother MU has some legitimate points about the two-faced nature of the NCAA. But will they do something? No, absent a change ordered by a final court of appeals.

Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2019, 10:46:53 PM »
Brother Cheeks, I hear you Man. But for crying out loud, haven't you seen the NCAA's commercials touting their commitment to academics. Saw yet another "gag me" commercial featuring Jerry Rice last weekend.

Brother MU has some legitimate points about the two-faced nature of the NCAA. But will they do something? No, absent a change ordered by a final court of appeals.

Because an athletic scholarship for most of these student athletes means an academic degree. There is nothing wrong or improper with association.  One begets the other.

 Where Mikey keeps wanting the ncaa to do is get involved in areas it cannot and should not, or in this example he wrongly attacks the ncaa instead of those voting it down. The ncaa is an association of members schools including Marquette.  The ncaa isn’t one person making decisions.  Mikey should be upset at the schools that voted the way they did and call out their hypocrisy if he doesn’t like it.  The irony is his own linked article shows the ncaa recommended the approach to adopt the changes, but it was the membership within the committee that did not.  Mikey continues to want it be the big bad ncaa, but it is the membership that is voting this way...not some ncaa bureaucrats in Indianapolis. 
« Last Edit: October 07, 2019, 10:59:36 PM by Cheeks »
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GooooMarquette

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2019, 11:33:56 PM »
It doesn’t whether you talk as though “the NCAA” is some monolithic entity, or simply the consensus of the members. The point (as dgeis says) is that it’s hypocritical for NCAA commercials to tout college athletes as “student athletes,” and at the same time ignore widespread academic fraud.

Either police the fraud, or drop the “student” part from NCAA commercials.

MU82

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2019, 11:41:19 PM »
Because an athletic scholarship for most of these student athletes means an academic degree. There is nothing wrong or improper with association.  One begets the other.

 Where Mikey keeps wanting the ncaa to do is get involved in areas it cannot and should not, or in this example he wrongly attacks the ncaa instead of those voting it down. The ncaa is an association of members schools including Marquette.  The ncaa isn’t one person making decisions.  Mikey should be upset at the schools that voted the way they did and call out their hypocrisy if he doesn’t like it.  The irony is his own linked article shows the ncaa recommended the approach to adopt the changes, but it was the membership within the committee that did not.  Mikey continues to want it be the big bad ncaa, but it is the membership that is voting this way...not some ncaa bureaucrats in Indianapolis.

Apparently, Mikey isn't the only one who wants to get the NCAA "involved" in cleaning up academic fraud. Numerous academics, including the president of the University of Oregon, and others with a few brains, including Condi Rice, also believe the NCAA should actually care about cleaning up the rampant fraud that its athlete-students are involved in.

But I mean, when compared to some cable guy who was banned by a fan site, what do university presidents and the former secretary of state know about anything?
“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

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Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2019, 08:49:03 AM »
It doesn’t whether you talk as though “the NCAA” is some monolithic entity, or simply the consensus of the members. The point (as dgeis says) is that it’s hypocritical for NCAA commercials to tout college athletes as “student athletes,” and at the same time ignore widespread academic fraud.

Either police the fraud, or drop the “student” part from NCAA commercials.

So let me get this straight, the fact ( and it is a fact ) that this overwhelming majority of student athletes on an athletic scholarship and participating in ncaa sports go on to earn a college degree...the ncaa cannot talk about, put up a commercial, even though it is true by a landslide because there are also some schools, which the ncaa cannot police as it is not an academic organization choose to do business differently? 

Do I have this correct?
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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dgies9156

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2019, 08:54:12 AM »
While I reiterate the existence of big-time hypocrisy in the NCAA, I also think that enforcing true academic standards is virtually impossible for an entity with more than 1,000 members. The spectrum of academic rigor ranges from UNLV and Liberty University on one end, to Harvard, Duke, Stanford, Georgetown, Vanderbilt and Marquette on the other.

Situations like the well-known UNC problems are extreme. You have other cases like the notorious Horton Row classes at Marquette ("How many Hortons were in your GPA?"). I'm sure there have been others over the years. We used to call them classes in Underwater Basket Weaving (a staple at the University of Tennessee) when I was young. Are these courses illegal? Should they be? Who is going to be the standards setter.

The NCAA surely does not have the staff or ability to become academic overlords, standards setters and certifiers. But the NCAA also should not go around pretending that it's an academic entity either.


Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2019, 09:00:07 AM »
Apparently, Mikey isn't the only one who wants to get the NCAA "involved" in cleaning up academic fraud. Numerous academics, including the president of the University of Oregon, and others with a few brains, including Condi Rice, also believe the NCAA should actually care about cleaning up the rampant fraud that its athlete-students are involved in.

But I mean, when compared to some cable guy who was banned by a fan site, what do university presidents and the former secretary of state know about anything?

Larry was banned?

Yes, there are many people, including myself and Mikey that want to clean up academic fraud, including the bureaucrats at the ncaa, but it takes the membership to make it so.  I could give you countless examples in real life about cleaning up fraud in welfare, or social security, etc (which ironically Mikey said we shouldn’t bother going after those fraudsters) but we don’t because not enough of the membership votes to make it happen. 

What would have been nice is if the journalist would have provided a few reasons why the members voted it down in the ncaa committee.  We don’t know if the journalist even tried to find out as usually they would say blah blah was asked for comment, but declined.  Maybe as a journalism mentor, Mikey can reach out to this journalist to find out why the schools that voted it down did?  Was it the way in which the proposal was written and a simple tweak would get their vote, or was it something nefarious as Mikey alleges?  Even better, what is MU’s stance on this?  Does MU support the proposal, or are we also part of the terrible academic fraud the evil ncaa pushes and allows daily across this nation (God Bless America).  That way you don’t have to offer your opinion, but can actually play journalist again.  What do you think?
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2019, 09:03:13 AM »
While I reiterate the existence of big-time hypocrisy in the NCAA, I also think that enforcing true academic standards is virtually impossible for an entity with more than 1,000 members. The spectrum of academic rigor ranges from UNLV and Liberty University on one end, to Harvard, Duke, Stanford, Georgetown, Vanderbilt and Marquette on the other.

Situations like the well-known UNC problems are extreme. You have other cases like the notorious Horton Row classes at Marquette ("How many Hortons were in your GPA?"). I'm sure there have been others over the years. We used to call them classes in Underwater Basket Weaving (a staple at the University of Tennessee) when I was young. Are these courses illegal? Should they be? Who is going to be the standards setter.

The NCAA surely does not have the staff or ability to become academic overlords, standards setters and certifiers. But the NCAA also should not go around pretending that it's an academic entity either.

Of course it is impossible.  Each of these members is supposed to do some level of self policing and agreed to honor the ethical norms required by the association.  But there are humans involved, and that’s where it goes off the tracks.  There are also actual organizations internally at schools and external accreditation bodies that do what Mikey and others want.  If a school’s own internal procedures and processes are allowing it to go on, then that is on them.  They are failing their own student athletes, but of course the ncaa is to blame for what the school is doing?  Interesting.
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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Fluffy Blue Monster

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2019, 09:06:48 AM »
Cheeks is right.  The NCAA doesn't have the resources to track academic fraud, which is a much more nuanced and "squishy" thing then much of the other issues it needs to police.  It's difficult to track academic fraud as a potential excess benefit (student athlete only classes, tutoring, etc.) but out and out fraud like in the case of UNC?  That's not in their wheelhouse and shouldn't be.
“True patriotism hates injustice in its own land more than anywhere else.”  -Clarence Darrow

MU82

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2019, 09:11:58 AM »
Larry was banned?

Yes, there are many people, including myself and Mikey that want to clean up academic fraud, including the bureaucrats at the ncaa, but it takes the membership to make it so.  I could give you countless examples in real life about cleaning up fraud in welfare, or social security, etc (which ironically Mikey said we shouldn’t bother going after those fraudsters) but we don’t because not enough of the membership votes to make it happen. 

What would have been nice is if the journalist would have provided a few reasons why the members voted it down in the ncaa committee.  We don’t know if the journalist even tried to find out as usually they would say blah blah was asked for comment, but declined.  Maybe as a journalism mentor, Mikey can reach out to this journalist to find out why the schools that voted it down did?  Was it the way in which the proposal was written and a simple tweak would get their vote, or was it something nefarious as Mikey alleges?  Even better, what is MU’s stance on this?  Does MU support the proposal, or are we also part of the terrible academic fraud the evil ncaa pushes and allows daily across this nation (God Bless America).  That way you don’t have to offer your opinion, but can actually play journalist again.  What do you think?

Well, all kinds of deflecting and crapola in there.

But hey, everybody can't have your kind of great and unmatched wisdom.
“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

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GooooMarquette

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2019, 09:20:37 AM »
So let me get this straight, the fact ( and it is a fact ) that this overwhelming majority of student athletes on an athletic scholarship and participating in ncaa sports go on to earn a college degree...the ncaa cannot talk about, put up a commercial, even though it is true by a landslide because there are also some schools, which the ncaa chooses cannot to police as it is not an academic organization choose to do business differently? 

Do I have this correct?

You were so close. But congratulations on the effort.

GooooMarquette

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2019, 09:22:58 AM »
Cheeks is right.  The NCAA doesn't have the resources to track academic fraud, which is a much more nuanced and "squishy" thing then much of the other issues it needs to police.  It's difficult to track academic fraud as a potential excess benefit (student athlete only classes, tutoring, etc.) but out and out fraud like in the case of UNC?  That's not in their wheelhouse and shouldn't be.


That's fine, but then they should stop emphasizing academics in their commercials.

If individual schools that really do have superior academics want to tout them, then they can have at it.

MU82

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2019, 09:30:25 AM »
Cheeks is right.  The NCAA doesn't have the resources to track academic fraud, which is a much more nuanced and "squishy" thing then much of the other issues it needs to police.  It's difficult to track academic fraud as a potential excess benefit (student athlete only classes, tutoring, etc.) but out and out fraud like in the case of UNC?  That's not in their wheelhouse and shouldn't be.

I might agree on this, Sultan, but NCAA leadership has consistently passed on even seriously considering rooting out academic fraud. They have ignored recommendations from numerous commissions, and they wouldn't even consider a proposal from one of their own university presidents, who said he thought he would have the backing of the full Pac-12.

I have seen no argument yet rebutting the two most serious charges levied by a couple of people in that article:

“The fact that the association is so resistive to this kind of scrutiny suggests that there is so much (more academic fraud) out there than they want to have revealed" and ...

The NCAA is an "economic cartel squashing a reform idea that could have helped improve academic protections for college athletes."
“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

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Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2019, 09:37:54 AM »
Here’s the question I would be asking.  One of my favorite comedians, George Carlin, once said, “Where are the people of conscience?”

All these universities, with professors, instructors, potential future professors (TA’s) that have an ideal or ideological leaning (per countless surveys and research)...why are they not blowing the whistle?  Did they get into teaching to pass kids through or to educate?  These folks have protections, including tenure for some of them...if academic fraud is SO RAMPANT as several here say it is, where are the people of conscious on these campuses?  Why are they allowing this?  The very people entrusted and paid to educate these kids are en masse turning a blind eye against the ideals many of them do not support?  Many of these schools public, and tax supported by the way.  Why are these people allowing it to happen?  It simply cannot happen without their involvement...right?

That would be the question I would be asking.  Where are the people of conscience? 

”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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Benny B

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2019, 09:48:51 AM »
How long you going to beat your head against this one?

The National Collegiate ATHLETIC Association




My apologies as I may need to upgrade beyond Windows 3.11, but on my computer, "Collegiate" appears to be listed before "Athletic."

Wow, I'm very concerned for Benny.  Being able to mimic Myron Medcalf's writing so closely implies an oncoming case of dementia.

Pakuni

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2019, 10:08:30 AM »
Here’s the question I would be asking.  One of my favorite comedians, George Carlin, once said, “Where are the people of conscience?”

All these universities, with professors, instructors, potential future professors (TA’s) that have an ideal or ideological leaning (per countless surveys and research)...why are they not blowing the whistle?  Did they get into teaching to pass kids through or to educate?  These folks have protections, including tenure for some of them...if academic fraud is SO RAMPANT as several here say it is, where are the people of conscious on these campuses?  Why are they allowing this?  The very people entrusted and paid to educate these kids are en masse turning a blind eye against the ideals many of them do not support?  Many of these schools public, and tax supported by the way.  Why are these people allowing it to happen?  It simply cannot happen without their involvement...right?

That would be the question I would be asking.  Where are the people of conscience?

Perhaps because whistleblowing against college sports programs leads to death threats, career destruction and smear campaigns?
See: Murray Sperber
See: Mary Willingham
See: Jan Gangelhoff
See: Linda Bensel-Meyers
See: Jan Kemp

Shocking, though, that you're trying to make this political.

Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2019, 11:00:54 PM »
Perhaps because whistleblowing against college sports programs leads to death threats, career destruction and smear campaigns?
See: Murray Sperber
See: Mary Willingham
See: Jan Gangelhoff
See: Linda Bensel-Meyers
See: Jan Kemp

Shocking, though, that you're trying to make this political.

Death threats?  Justice for Juicy kind, or real?  Sorry if I don’t buy into some of that nonsense.  I’m sure some were legit, but let’s not pretend people don’t claim death threats as some martyrdom play and they don’t happen at all, or are not to be taken seriously.  Dr. Sperber guest lectured one of my classes.  He got over the fear awfully quick.   ;)

But let’s say they were all legit, you giving a free pass to all these educators not doing the right thing to allow widespread academic scandals to happen...where are the people of conscience?
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2019, 11:10:30 PM »
My apologies as I may need to upgrade beyond Windows 3.11, but on my computer, "Collegiate" appears to be listed before "Athletic."


No DOS for you?  Come on man.   :D

LOL...an athletic association of colleges, but not an academic association of colleges. 
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
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Pakuni

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2019, 08:13:17 AM »
Death threats?  Justice for Juicy kind, or real?  Sorry if I don’t buy into some of that nonsense.  I’m sure some were legit, but let’s not pretend people don’t claim death threats as some martyrdom play and they don’t happen at all, or are not to be taken seriously.  Dr. Sperber guest lectured one of my classes.  He got over the fear awfully quick.   ;)

But let’s say they were all legit, you giving a free pass to all these educators not doing the right thing to allow widespread academic scandals to happen...where are the people of conscience?

It's telling that a guy who'll endlessly whine about multimillionaire comedians losing a gigs over racist and homophobic remarks will so lightly dismiss the actual suffering of everyday people because it doesn't suit his biases.
All of these cases I've cited have been thoroughly reported and vetted and no one questions thr credibility.

I'm giving a free pass to no one. The fact is that the major academic scandals over the years - Georgia, Minnesota - haven't been perpetrated by professors. They've largely involved tutors and athletic department staff members  - hey, weren't you one of those? - who've done the athletes' work.
If you really want to question anyone here, let's discuss the kind of low-character, ethically challenged people employed by athletic departments.
I get that you're trying so hard to go on a Fox News rant about liberal professors, but it's really not relevant to a discussion about why the NCAA isn't serious about academic fraud.
Seriously, doesn't it get exhausting trying to turn everything in your life into an issue of partisan politics?
« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 08:21:40 AM by Pakuni »

Benny B

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2019, 12:18:44 PM »

No DOS for you?  Come on man.   :D

LOL...an athletic association of colleges, but not an academic association of colleges.

Too bad the grammar thread got shut down.  I wish I knew if there was a term to describe for two phrases having the same order of words but materially different meanings depending upon the placement of punctuation.  For example:

MUScoop without her Chicos is aimless   vs.     MUScoop: without her, Chicos is aimless


I am - of course - assuming that Scoop is feminine, which should be obvious considering that most of the time it's an unwilling recipient for loads of testosterone-laden bullshiite that only pushes back if bad language is used.
Wow, I'm very concerned for Benny.  Being able to mimic Myron Medcalf's writing so closely implies an oncoming case of dementia.

Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2019, 09:15:12 PM »
It's telling that a guy who'll endlessly whine about multimillionaire comedians losing a gigs over racist and homophobic remarks will so lightly dismiss the actual suffering of everyday people because it doesn't suit his biases.
All of these cases I've cited have been thoroughly reported and vetted and no one questions thr credibility.

I'm giving a free pass to no one. The fact is that the major academic scandals over the years - Georgia, Minnesota - haven't been perpetrated by professors. They've largely involved tutors and athletic department staff members  - hey, weren't you one of those? - who've done the athletes' work.
If you really want to question anyone here, let's discuss the kind of low-character, ethically challenged people employed by athletic departments.
I get that you're trying so hard to go on a Fox News rant about liberal professors, but it's really not relevant to a discussion about why the NCAA isn't serious about academic fraud.
Seriously, doesn't it get exhausting trying to turn everything in your life into an issue of partisan politics?

How is this political at all?  By the way, lots of things were thoroughly vetted only not to be when they truly were thoroughly vetted....if you get my drift.

Sperber and others claimed to get a death threat.  Sorry, but some half cocked drunk dude at 2:30am in his basement firing off an email...I think the guy should do jail time for sending it, but do I think it is truly an intent to kill or real...no, I don’t...weren’t we having a convo about sabatoging planes and such not long ago around intent, etc on the Super Bar.  Remember when intent mattered?

I’m saying quite simply, if this is so rampant as some alledge, why are more people not standing up.  That is a legit question that you don’t seem to have an answer for.  If worried about death threats or retribution, go anonymously to the press.  I didn’t say just professors, but included students as well.  Right?  You might have missed it, but students, TAs, etc.  The people that have to make the rampant cheating happen, or are unfairly impacted by it...why aren’t they standing up? I realize it is easy to paint the ncaa as the boogeyman, and they have plenty of blame...but how about the enablers?

Or, is it possible at all, do you think, that maybe the rampant statement was overblown?
« Last Edit: October 10, 2019, 05:43:03 AM by Cheeks »
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
― Thomas Jefferson

Cheeks

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Re: NCAA once again refuses to consider dealing with academic fraud
« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2019, 09:16:01 PM »
Too bad the grammar thread got shut down.  I wish I knew if there was a term to describe for two phrases having the same order of words but materially different meanings depending upon the placement of punctuation.  For example:

MUScoop without her Chicos is aimless   vs.     MUScoop: without her, Chicos is aimless


I am - of course - assuming that Scoop is feminine, which should be obvious considering that most of the time it's an unwilling recipient for loads of testosterone-laden bullshiite that only pushes back if bad language is used.

Scoop is definitely feminine
”The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”
― Thomas Jefferson